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Renaissance: Counter-Renaissance

Monday, 30 October 2017 at 20:46

Book cover to Renaissance: Counter-Renaissance on Dr John Dunn.



The Renaissance was not simply a rebirth of classical thought from out of the Dark Ages, that led seamlessly to the Reformation, the so-called Enlightenment and on to modernity. It was, rather, a conscious uprising against a ruling oligarchy that had imposed its ideas upon the minds of an enslaved mankind for a thousand years.

Men and women were crushed under the Diocletian Order for the whole of the Dark Ages, whilst their spirit was held in the religious shackles of the Jehovian Settlement. Yet a light flickered during these long dark centuries, a Platonic Underground, a conspiracy of intelligence, which kept alive the ideas that were eventually to burgeon forth in Dante’s unsurpassable Divine Comedy.

There have been innumerable mystical interpretations of Dante’s revolutionary masterpiece over the centuries, but all these readings have been, and continue to be, nothing other than decoys from the main point of the work, which is politically the most explosive ever written.

For in this work, the individual attains both crown and mitre, the power of mind over which no secular or clerical authority can rule.

It is the Comedy because of its positive ending, as opposed to a tragedy; and what an ending - nothing less than man’s deification, capax Dei, man become god.

So explosive were these writings that they triggered an uprising against the Guelphic oligarchy, a cultural, philosophical and political revolution that has since come to be known as the Renaissance.

A correct reading of Dante’s Comedy is thus essential to an undistorted understanding of the Renaissance. It is also needed if a consciousness of the Counter-Renaissance is to be rescued from the obscurantism of Guelphic histories.

These were the revolutionary ideas that inspired Nicholas of Cusa, Gemistos Plethon, Erasmus and Thomas More, amongst many others, providing the intellectual groundwork for the flowering of art, culture, philosophy and political ideas that had the potential to lift mankind out of bestiality and into a deified realm.

The potential was never fully realised. The Renaissance was crushed by the resurgent ruling oligarchy in a Counter-Renaissance, which was more ruthless in its exploitation and bestialisation of mankind on a global scale than ever before. Most cruelly, the mind of man has remained controlled and manipulated by the Guelphic oligarchy in the name of freedom ever since.

New theoretical work is needed to explain how mankind was led once more into this state of bestiality. In response, my book, Renaissance: Counter-Renaissance, presents a reading of the Comedy as Dante intended, in order that the ideas driving the Renaissance uprising might be fully appreciated.

The origins of feudalism are traced in the Diocletian Order, which was inseparable from the Jehovian Settlement of Constantine, the newly constructed Christian creed of Nicaea, which enchained minds and subdued whole populations to lives of abasement for the next millennium and more.

The path of the Renaissance uprising is followed to where it led politically. Likewise the Counter-Renaissance, explaining how the Diocletian Order and Jehovian Settlement were re-established in new and vigorous forms, and how mankind remains enslaved as a result.

Connecting the socio-political issues confronting Dante with those of our own time has necessitated a transdisciplinary approach, one that recovers a coherent narrative from beneath the crazed ‘histories’ of the disconnected academic disciplines. The result is a reading of the past that has serious implications for the future.


© John Dunn.

A Zoroastrian reflection of Heaven on earth, and the force which opposes this

Tuesday, 17 October 2017 at 21:41

Zarathustran good and evil on Dr John Dunn. Asha, for Zarathustra, was ideal creation, the totality of the vision of ideal existence. It is a fundamental concept of Zoroastrianism. There is no adequate translation of Asha, although the following impart something ofits essence. World-order, Truth, Right, righteousness and holiness. In short, it did not mean in our small-minded empirical way, the truth or falsity of a statement.

The Truth for Zarathustra was the relationship of all things in such a way that nothing occurs at the expense of something else. In such perfect harmony there is no friction in existence.

This ideal world of Zarathustra was to be idealised in the material world. Ahura Mazda, God, literally 'Wise Lord', the Supreme Being of the Zoroastrians, in his wisdom conceived ofa perfect existence in purely ideal terms and this is what is called Asha, the Truth.

So Truth then means an ideal form of existence,where nothing is in conflict, or in abrasion, with anything else. It is also the notion of social justice. In an earthly reflection of the World-order, no-one prospers at the cost of somebody’s injury.

The ideal world was supposed to be actualised in matter, lived in Asha, to a state of total perfection.

However,and here comes the essential dualist doctrine of Zarathustra, within the material world there is also the possibility that Asha may not be actualised.

Indeed, Zarathustra says there are two forces. Thereis the spirit which promotes Asha and there is the spirit which opposesand frustrates Asha.

And this is the eternal dualism, the struggle between good and evil.

Christianity once recognised such a struggle, but now it is glossed over by pseudo-Christianity, Judaeo-Christianity.

Jesus,the incarnation of Truth, confronted the evil epitomised by Pharisaic self-righteousness and hypocrisy, and the Roman moral relativism of Pontius Pilate. Said Jesus, ‘Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword’ (Matthew 10:34)


© John Dunn.

Epoptika!

Monday, 16 October 2017 at 21:13

Epoptika flash of light on Dr John Dunn.



At the climax to the Comedy, Dante conjured a vision of Eleusinian light, epoptika! no less, a participative union with the ‘glory of Him who moves all things’, capax Dei.

...my mind was struck by a flash
In which what it desired came to it.


The power of man’s imagination, and the creative freedom from servitude to sense perception were central, literally central, to the participative nature of man’s relationship to God explored in the Comedy.

With the imagination, man is of all animals uniquely endowed to imagine, look forward, contemplate new futures and, above all, hope. As such man has an active rather than a passive relationship to God. Man’s creativity, expressed through art, was the hallmark of the Renaissance, a movement that had its seeds in Dante’s imagination.

Dante’s experience of the One is Eleusinian, it revives Plato’s own employment of the Eleusis metaphor of philosophical enlightenment. Jesus is absent from Dante’s great Christian work, despite the incarnation, ‘our effigy’, being prominent.

Dante's devotional epic was expressive of a Christianity that was deeply Hellenic and Platonic.

....out of a tradition that was firmly rooted in the Hellenist origins of Christianity.


© John Dunn.

With the angels or the sheep?

Sunday, 15 October 2017 at 18:24

Dante on Dr John Dunn.











Dante lists those excluded from the inner circle.


  1. Those with a defect of body occurs when its parts do not function correctly, so that it cannot receive anything, as with the deaf, the dumb, and suchlike.
  2. Those with a defect of the spirit, which occurs when evil conquers it, so that it follows vicious pleasures, by which it is so deceived that through it everything becomes vile.
  3. Those with domestic and civic responsibility, which properly engages most men, so that they have no time for contemplation.
  4. Those with a defect arising from the location where someone is born and raised, which often not only lacks all places of learning, but is distant from educated people.
1 and 3 are deserving of excuse and pardon; the other two merit our censure and scorn, though one more than the other.

Anyone who reflects deeply can plainly see that there are few who can attain to that habit of knowledge desired by all, while those who live deprived forever of this nourishment are innumerable. Oh, blessed are the few who sit at that table where the bread of angels is eaten! And wretched are those who must graze along with the sheep!

(From the opening paragraphs of Book 1 of Il Convivio [The Banquet] by Dante Alighieri)


© John Dunn.

The Renaissance: a Platonist revolution

Saturday, 14 October 2017 at 22:04

Eleusinian gods on Dr John Dunn.


















At the climax to the Comedy,Dante conjured a vision of Eleusinian light, epoptika! - a participative union with the ‘glory of Him who moves all things’, capax Dei.

...my mind was struck by a flash
In which what it desired came to it.


The power of man’s imagination, and the creative freedom from servitude to sense perception were central, literally central, to the participative nature of man’s relationship to God explored in the Comedy.

With the imagination, man is of all animals uniquely endowed to look forward, contemplate new futures and, above all, hope. As such man has an active rather than a passive relationship to God. Man’s creativity, expressed through art, was the hallmark of the Renaissance, a movement that had its seeds in Dante’s imagination.

Dante’s experience of the One is Eleusinian, it revives Plato’s own employment of the Eleusis metaphor of philosophical enlightenment. Jesus is absent from Dante’s great Christian work, despite the incarnation, ‘our effigy’, being prominent.

Being platonic in metaphor, Dante's devotional epic was out of a tradition that was firmly rooted in the Hellenist origins of Christianity. Dante was consciously reviving that tradition from under the accretions of Judaism.

The Renaissance can thus be seen as a Platonist revolution, with an aim to restore the Hellenic tradition in religion, as well as in culture more generally.


© John Dunn.

Nietzsche called them the superfluous and so they remain

Friday, 13 October 2017 at 21:44

Nietzsche on Dr John Dunn. Who are these that steal the works of creators?

Who are these that vomit their bile and call it a newspaper?

Nietzsche called them the superfluous and so they remain.







FROM THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA BY FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

Behold the superfluous! They steal the works of the creators and the treasures of the wise. Education, they call their theft -- and everything becomes sickness and trouble to them!

Behold the superfluous! They are always sick; they vomit their bile and call it a newspaper. They devour each other and cannot even digest themselves.

Behold the superfluous! They acquire wealth and become the poorer for it. They seek power, and the lever of power, much money -- these impotent ones!

See them clamber, these nimble apes! They clamber over one another, and thus pull each other into the mud and the abyss.

They all strive for the throne: this is their madness -- as if happiness sat on the throne! Often filth sits on the throne. -- and often also the throne on filth.

Madmen they all seem to me, and clambering apes, and too eager. Foul smells their idol to me, the cold monster: foul they all smell to me, these idolaters.

My brothers, will you suffocate in the fumes of their maws and appetites! Better to break the windows and jump into the open air!

Escape from their foul stench! Escape from the idolatry of the superfluous!

Escape from their foul stench!


Posted by John Dunn.

Truth comes before error

Wednesday, 11 October 2017 at 20:47

Plethon on Dr John Dunn. Alternatives to modernist progressivism in the work of Gemistus Pletho, or Plethon.

In The Nomoi, (Plethon’s Book of Laws)there is a clear allusion to contemporary ‘sophistry’ and especially to Christian eschatology that was dominant in Plethon’s time. There is a difference between Plethon’s ‘wise men’ and these contemporary ‘sophists’: the former are not misled into thinking that the truth could be posterior to ‘what has been falsely said or what is falsely attested’. Truth comes before error. If an error is now identified, then one should turn back in order to recover truth. This statement targets Judaeo-Christian revelation and what we would now call modern progressivism. Though it does not indict a purely Christian theology of resurrection, a re-birth and fresh start through the new Adam.

It is not surprising that Ezra Pound thought that Plethon had developed the mysterium in new and interesting ways, very relevant to modern times.


© John Dunn.

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